Monthly Archives: July 2016

Baby Food

baby2Baby Food
by Saxton Freymann and Joost Elffers
Scholastic Press, 2003

Although out of print and only available in libraries or as used, I couldn’t resist introducing Baby Food, by Saxton Freymann and Joost Elffers.  Each page of intense pink, blue, yellow or green features a baby animal carved and decorated out of a piece of fruit or vegetable. Expand a child’s imagination and creativity with Baby Food while simultaneously introducing vegetables and fruits.  A child could have fun calling out the animal and calling out the food used.  When they get a bit older, try making your own animal with your helper.  Find out how they make a baby alligator out of a yam and a mouse out of radishes!

Available as a used selection on Amazon; check your library, too!

The Bear Ate Your Sandwich

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The Bear Ate Your Sandwich
By Julia Sarcone-Roach
Alfred A Knopf, 2015

In a hilarious, wild tale, a narrator shares how the bear ate berries from a truck, that carried him over rivers and bridges and into town.  The bear explored everything with a smell, from garbage cans, to farmers markets, to dumpsters.  He discovered the park and played, until he found the sandwich, which he gobbled up straightaway.  Knowing he did wrong, he dashed up a tree and, missing his forest, caught a boat home.  “So.  That’s what happened to your sandwich.  The bear ate it,” says the dog (narrator) to the knowing little girl.  A fun tall tale, a great read aloud.

Read more reviews and purchase on Amazon.

 

A Second is a Hiccup, A Child’s Book of Time

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A Second is a Hiccup, A Child’s Book of Time

by Hazel Hutchins, illustrated by Kady MacDonald Denton
Arthur A. Levine Books, 2007
Originally published in Canada

Hazel Hutchins introduces ‘time’ using playful rhymes and Kady MacDonald Denton uses light, moving pastels and pen and ink drawings to show some of the many activities that fit into one’s second, minute, hour, day, week, month, season, and year.  Activities mentioned include everything from building snowmen, to reading hidden beneath a blanket tent, to helping brother count to ten.  Pull out a watch and calendar when you read this book!

Read more reviews and purchase on Amazon.

One Day in the Eucalyptus, Eucalyptus Tree

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One Day in the Eucalyptus, Eucalyptus Tree

by Daniel Bernstrom, illustrated by Brendan Wenzel
Katherine Tegen Books, 2016

A fun, perfectly-rhymed story where a snake gobbles a boy and the clever boy, from inside the snake’s belly, dares the snake to eat more.  One by one, the snake eats a bird, a cat, a sloth, an ape, and still the boy dares him to eat more.  The snake takes on bursting-huge proportions, yet is talked into eating a teeny-tiny fly.  Of course, the snake is so sick he throws up everything he has eaten.   Filled with fun-sounding, mostly made-up words it’s just fun to listen to the story and enjoy the brightly colored pictures.

Read more reviews on Amazon.

The Quiet Place

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The Quiet Place
by Sarah Stewart, illustrated by David Small
Margaret Ferguson Books, 2012

Isabel and her family move from rural Mexico to urban Minnesota.  A vast difference in climate, culture, and language.  Isabel finds solace in writing to her Auntie Lupita and in a large refrigerator box.  She decorates the box with colors and things from Mexico.  When the box is ruined in the rain, she collects other boxes to build herself a new quiet place.  Through letters to her Auntie and illustrations of her expanding box collection, we follow Isabel through adjustments at school, in the neighborhood, and in making new friends.  It culminates with a celebration where she shares her decorated boxes and other creative activities with other children.  Going to school the next day is easier.

The Quiet Place is based on a true story of a friend of author Sarah Stewart.

Read more reviews on Amazon.

Charlotte and the Quiet Place

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Charlotte and the Quiet Place

by Deborah Sosin, illustrated by Sara Woolley
Plum Blossom Books, 2015

Everywhere Charlotte goes, it is noisy.  At home, in her neighborhood, at school.  It is even noisy at the library and park, where it’s supposed to be quiet.  All she wants is a quiet place.  One day her dog goes after a squirrel, breaks away and runs deep into a grove.  They sit down to rest and Charlotte gets in touch with her breathing and becomes mindful of the quiet.  She finds a quiet place, deep within her belly.  She eventually leaves the park, but takes her quiet place with her.  Where ever she is, no matter how noisy or quiet, she can think of her quiet place, feel its pleasures and shut out the noisy world around her.  Perfect for the introvert, the quiet child who needs to be in touch with their quiet place, and the rambunctious child that needs a quiet place to rest.

Read more reviews on Amazon.

Chameleon Sees Colors

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Chameleon Sees Colors

by Anita Bijsterbosch
Clavis Publishing Inc, 2015
Originally published in Belgium and Holland

This interactive book features cut outs to see part of the next page that includes a clue of what’s to come.  Chameleon starts out black and each page turn he sees a new animal of a new color and he begins to take on the new colors.  He goes through the primary and secondary colors until he reaches a purple girl chameleon!  Chameleon “thinks purple is the prettiest color he has ever seen!”  A simple story that introduces chameleons and colors.

Read more reviews on Amazon.

The Sound of All Things

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The Sound of All Things

by Myron Uhlberg, illustrated by Ted Papoulas
Peachtree Publishers, 2016

We get a glimpse into the world of the deaf, when a son shares how he feels and what he thinks when he’s with his deaf father who is always asking him, “What did you hear?”  When the boy says, “Loud,” his father wants more, so the boy says, “Heavy.  Like Thunder.”  Eventually a librarian shows the boy a book of poetry and the boy finds more words to describe sound.  The book begins to bring awareness of how different a deaf person’s world is when sound is missing.  The story features the love shared among family members, expanding one’s vocabulary, and the stillness of life for the deaf.  The award-winning author is the son of two deaf parents.

Read more reviews and purchase on Amazon.