Monthly Archives: December 2018

Madeline Finn and the Shelter Dog

Madeline Finn and the Shelter Dog
by Lisa Papp
Peachtree Publishers

Madeline, of Madeline Finn and the Library Dog, learns about and visits an animal shelter.  She volunteers by rummaging their closet for old towels to donate. To help more, she collects towels from neighbors. But she wants to let the animals know they are loved and coordinates a “read to the shelter animals’ day”, like they have at the library.

An endearing story showing a child who made a difference in her world.

Read more reviews on Amazon.

Carter Reads the Newspaper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carter Reads the Newspaper
by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Don Tate
Peachtree Publishers, 2018

Carter Reads the Newspaper documents the history of Black History Month, beginning with two unknown figures.  Oliver Jones, a coal miner, and Carter G. Woodson, a former miner and, later, historian.

Oliver opened his home to other miners and provided them books written by African-Americans and newspapers from all over the world.  One of the people visiting his home was Carter, who had had some education and knew how to read.  He soon began reading to others.  When others asked questions about the news, Carter researched them and found the answers. After three years in the mines, he returned to school, graduating at age 20, eventually earning his Ph.D. in history from Harvard.  In 1926 he established Negro History Week, which later expanded into Black History Month.

Well documented story, with illustrations inspiring pride. The book also includes illustrations of 43 Black leaders and a bit about them.

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Step up to the Plate, Maria Singh

Step up to the Plate, Maria Singh
by Uma Krishnaswami
Tu Books, 2017

Set in Yolo County California in the 1940s. The top story features Maria Singh, a girl from a mixed marriage (India/Mexico) who loves baseball, but woven into the story are multiple subplots.  The rich layers include: a heartfelt story on how the family and community made up of different cultures support each other during important challenges, even when they may not normally support each other; old laws where people not from America can’t purchase their own land; interracial marriages are not allowed; and baseball for girls. It includes insights on women working during World War II when men were on the battlefields.

I heard Uma Krishnaswami speak at a picture book bootcamp and she gave a talk like no other I have heard.  I felt empowered to write.  She detailed several of her journeys to publication, sharing how the stories started, evolved and ended.   Insightful and meaningful.

Read more reviews on Amazon.