Monthly Archives: January 2019

Geraldine

Geraldine
by Elizabeth Lilly
A Neal Porter Book, 2018

Geraldine moves to a new school where she is the only giraffe and is soon known as “That Giraffe Girl.”  At her old school she was ‘Geraldine”, but here she is “That Giraffe Girl.”  Feeling left out, she hides behind a tree, sort of.  One day another girl sits in Geraldine’s tree spot. The new girl, Cassie, is defensive as everyone calls her names because she’s smart, likes math and organizes her food.  Soon they start playing together, and like it.  One day Geraldine drags Cassie to the lunch table and introduces her as someone who can stay in a handstand for 167 seconds.  The other kids are impressed.  Cassie introduces Geraldine as the Queen of England. The kids are quiet, until Geraldine gives them her most queenly royal wave, and they all laugh.

A beautifully written book that provides a role model showing the importance of being one’s self even when you move to a new school.  I suspect more Geraldine books will soon turn up.

Read more reviews on Amazon.

Hoot Owl, Master of Disguise

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hoot Owl, Master of Disguise
by Sean Taylor, Illustrated by Jean Jullien
Candlewick Press, 2015

This humorous mystery book keeps the pages turning!

Hoot Owl disguises himself in costumes to sneak up on his prey.  He is not deterred when the rabbit hops away from his carrot disguise.  He immediately locates his next victim and cleverly creates his next disguise.  But lo, his victims never end up in his tummy, until the last one!  This g rated ending provides a humorous, satisfying conclusion.

With creative descriptions, tension and repetitive phrases, young readers will want to read this clever story again and again.

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The Day You Begin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Day You Begin
by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by Rafael Lopez
Nancy Paulsen Books, 2018

Jacqueline Woodson writes a deeply felt book on diversity as only she can.

Told in second person, the books speaks frankly to its readers about how “no one … is quite like you.”  She shares many ways in which everyone is different from everyone else.  She shows how her summer story of reading books to her sister can be just as wonderful as everyone else’s stories of summer travel.  And it shows how even when you are excluded from teams and play, how you still have “your own brave self”.  It ends with, “every … friend has something a little like you—and something else so fabulously not quite like you…”  A book that speaks to the heart and gently enlightens and empowers the soul and imagination into a world of acceptance of differences.  Beautiful story.

Read more reviews on Amazon.