Newbery Award Lists

Newbery Medal

The Newbery Medal, named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery, is awarded annually to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. It is awarded by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association.

2015 Medal Winner

The CrossoverThe Crossover, written by Kwame Alexander
Twelve-year-old narrator Josh Bell uses the rhythms of a poetry jam to emulate the “moving & grooving/popping and rocking” of life on the basketball court with his twin brother, J.B. This powerful novel in verse paints an authentic portrait of a closely-knit family on the brink of crisis. Swish! This book is nothing but net!  (see reviews on Amazon)


Honor Books:

El DeafoEl Deafo, written by Cece Bell, illustrated by Cece Bell
In this insightful and humorous graphic novel memoir, Cece Bell portrays growing up with a giant hearing aid strapped to her chest. Themes of navigating a new school, sleepovers, finding a true friend and a first crush make this book universal in appeal. Bell shows that our differences are gifts that “can be turned into something amazing.”  (see reviews on Amazon)

BrowngirlBrown Girl Dreaming, written by Jacqueline Woodson
Jacqueline Woodson’s lyrical memoir chronicles the incidents and emotions she experienced as an African-American girl growing up in the 1960s and 1970s. Precise language magnifies moments and connects them to the larger historical narrative. Her elegant and evocative standalone poems weave a story about her development from a struggling reader and dreamer into a confident young woman and writer. (See Review by Susan)  (see reviews on Amazon)

2014 Medal Winner

Flora&UlyssesThe Illuminated Adventures, written by Kate DiCamillo
Comic book fan and natural-born cynic Flora Belle Buckman and Ulysses, a flying, superhero, poetry-writing squirrel, join forces to overcome Ulysses’ arch-nemesis, Flora’s mother and encounter a quirky cast of characters. Through poignant, laugh-out-loud episodes, this homage to comic books is a testament to the power of love.  (see reviews on Amazon)

Honor Books:

DollBonesDoll Bones
, written by Holly Black
In this distinctive coming-of-age tale, best friends Zach, Poppy and Alice set out on a life-altering quest driven by the presence of a sinister bone china doll who haunts their dreams and waking hours. Black explores complex questions of storytelling, imagination and changing friendships in this superbly haunting narrative.  (see reviews on Amazon)


BillyMillerThe Year of Billy Miller
, written by Kevin Henkes
Seven-year-old Billy Miller starts second grade with a bump on his head and a lot of worries, but during the year he develops better relationships with his teacher, his little sister, and his parents, and celebrates a quiet triumph of his own.  (see reviews on Amazon)

 

OneCameHomeOne Came Home, written by Amy Timberlake
In 1871 Wisconsin, love, betrayal, grief and violence spur 13-year-old Georgie on a gripping adventure full of hardship, heartbreak and terror. As she tries to solve the mystery of her sister’s disappearance, Georgie and her brash, humorous voice pull readers along on her journey of self-discovery.  (see reviews on Amazon)


paperboyPaperboy
, written by Vince Vawter
Little Man, a sensitive and resilient 11-year-old boy who stutters, ventures beyond the familiar and finds his voice while taking over his best friend’s paper route. Set in the summer heat of 1959 Memphis, “Paperboy” is a moving coming-of-age novel.  (see reviews on Amazon)

 

2013 Medal Winner

IvanThe One and Only Ivanby Katherine Applegate
Ivan’s transformative emergence from the “Ape at Exit 8” to “The One and Only Ivan, Mighty Silverback,” comes to life through the gorilla’s own distinct narrative voice, which is filled with wry humor, deep emotion and thought-provoking insights into the nature of friendship, hope and humanity.  (see reviews on Amazon)

 

Honor Books:
splendorsSplendors and Glooms by Laura Amy Schlitz, published by Candlewick Press
izzie Rose, Parsefall and Clara are caught in the clutches of a wicked puppeteer and a powerful witch in this deliciously dark and complex tale set in Dickensian England, where adventure and suspense are interwoven into nuanced explorations of good versus evil.  (see reviews on Amazon)

BombsBomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin
Balancing intersecting threads of scientific discovery, political intrigue and military strategy, “Bomb” is a riveting historical nonfiction drama. Sheinkin’s engaging narrative explores the complex series of events that led to the creation of the ultimate weapon and introduces many memorable personalities involved in the pursuit.  (see reviews on Amazon)

3x'sluckyThree Times Lucky by Sheila Turnage
In the rich tradition of Southern storytelling, rising sixth-grader Mo LoBeau leads the eccentric residents of Tupelo Landing, North Carolina, on a rollicking journey of mystery, adventure and small-town intrigue as she investigates a murder and searches for her long-lost mother.  (see reviews on Amazon)

 

2012 Medal Winner

Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos
The importance of history and reading (so you don’t do the same “stupid stuff” again) is at the heart of this achingly funny romp through a dying New Deal town. While mopping up epic nose bleeds, Jack narrates this screw-ball mystery in an endearing and believable voice.  (see reviews on Amazon)

Honor Books:
Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai
Hà and her family flee war-torn Vietnam for the American South. In spare yet vivid verse, she chronicles her year-long struggle to find her place in a new and shifting world.  (see reviews on Amazon)

Breaking Stalin’s Nose by Eugene Yelchin
On the eve of his induction into the Young Pioneers, Sasha’s world is overturned when his father is arrested by Stalin’s guard. Yelchin deftly crafts a stark and compelling story of a child’s lost idealism.  (see reviews on Amazon)

2011 Medal Winner

Moon over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool
The town of Manifest is based on Frontenac, Kan., the home of debut author Clare Vanderpool’s maternal grandparents. Vanderpool was inspired to write about what the idea of “home” might look like to a girl who had grown up riding the rails. She lives in Wichita with her husband and four children.  (see reviews on Amazon)

Honor Books:
Turtle in Paradise by Jennifer L. Holm
Sassy eleven-year-old Turtle finds her life turned on end when she is sent to live with her aunt in Depression-era Key West. With vivid details, witty dialogue and outrageous escapades, Jennifer Holm successfully explores the meaning of family and home… and lost treasures found.  (see reviews on Amazon)

Heart of a Samurai by Margi Preus
Shipwrecks, whaling, a search for home and a delightful exploration of cultures create a swashbuckling adventure. This historical novel is based on the true story of Manjiro (later John Mung), the young fisherman believed to be the first Japanese person to visit America, who against all odds, becomes a samurai.  (see reviews on Amazon)  (see review by Susan)

Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night by Joyce Sidman
Welcoming her readers into the “wild, enchanted park” that is the night, Joyce Sidman has elegantly crafted twelve poems rich in content and varied in format. Companion prose pieces about nocturnal flora and fauna are as tuneful and graceful as the poems. This collection is “a feast of sound and spark.”  (see reviews on Amazon)  (see review by Susan)

One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia
The voices of sisters Delphine, Vonetta and Fern sing in three-part harmony in this wonderfully nuanced, humorous novel set in 1968 Oakland, Calif. One crazy summer, the three girls find adventure when they are sent to meet their estranged poet-mother Cecile, who prints flyers for the Black Panthers.  (see reviews on Amazon)

Newbery Medal Winners – 1922-2010

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