Tag Archives: interactive

Spunky Little Monkey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spunky Little Monkey
Bill Martin Jr and Michael Sampson, illustrated by Brian Won
Scholastic Press, 2017

Bill Martin Jr (of Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?) does it again with a new interactive book for spunky toddlers.  Spunky Little Monkey is all about rhythm and rhyme, exercise and fun, and getting the body started in the morning.

Little Monkey has difficulty waking and the doctor prescribes exercise:
Rutabaga, Rutabaga
Sis! Boom! Bah!
POP UP, Monkey!
Rah! Rah! RAH!

Through a rhythmic, energetic, dancing song, monkey finds the rhythm in his head, then he finds the rhythm in his hands, then his feet and his hips.  When he puts them all together, he feels much better.  He gathers together his friends and off they go to play.  Perfect book to learn body parts and run off steam. Brian Won illustrates monkey action in a toned down rainbow palette, showing lots of actions; although most kids readers will be dancing, not enjoying the art work!

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Perfect Square

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Perfect Square

by Michael Hall
Greenwillow Books, 2011

Perfect Square starts with a red square on Monday and on each day of the week he explores all the things you can make from different color squares.  From a red square, he shapes a fountain that babbles, giggles and claps.  He shapes an orange square into flowers and a green square into a park.  Young ones can guess (or remember) the cut up shapes of each square and what they turn into.  A surprise at the end reviews all the shapes.  The colors are bright and vivid, the shapes are clever and simple.  A delight to explore while learning colors, shapes, and days of the week.

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Let’s Play

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Let’s Play
by Herve Tullet
Chronicle Books, 2016

Another interactive book by Herve Tullet, Let’s Play begins with a yellow dot who’s a bit bored.  To get started, he invites the reader to press the top corner.  On the next page the yellow dot is up in the corner.  The dot rides the wild lines, a ‘carousel’ and plays hide and seek with the reader.  Together, they enter a dark tunnel, a messy page of squiggles and come to a tall red ‘mountain’.  Let’s Play is the perfect book to introduce colors, stop lights, counting and having fun.  A perfect way to quietly play with a child.

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Lost. Found.

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Lost. Found.

By Marsha Diane Arnold, illustrated by Matthew Cordell
Neal Porter Books, 2015

This is a clever, interactive book that kids can tell the story with their own words.

Only two words, ‘Lost’ and ‘Found’, are used and the illustrations tell the rest of the story.  The story is about a red scarf that is lost by a bear and found by raccoons, but lost then found by a beaver, but lost then found by an otter, etc.  Lost by several more forest animals, they all circle around the lost scarf.  Each wanting it for their own, they jump at it to make it theirs.  This, of course, ruins everything and a pile of yarn lays on the snow-covered ground.  Remorsefully, they each gather a pile and sit together to knit another red scarf—which becomes long enough for everyone to enjoy!

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Finders Keepers

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Finders Keepers

by Keiko Kasza
G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2015

Squirrel buries an acorn and marks its location with this red, derby hat.  Of course, the wind blows it up into a tree and a bird decides to use it for a nest, but it wobbles out and lands on the water and is re-purposed as a boat.  And so the hat journeys through several owners until it comes full circle and lands where the squirrel left it.  When the squirrel gobbles the buried acorn and leaves behind the acorn top, the journey begins again!

A fun read for the young and a great way to show how one item can be many different things to different people.  It’s also a great way to discuss recycling and reusing objects.

If you liked stories showing different meanings for the same thing, consider the 1963 classic, Who Took the Farmers Hat? 

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One Boy

One Boy
by Laura Vaccaro Seeger
Neal Porter Book, Roaring Brook Press, 2008

The book opens with one boy, and the reader turns the page and discovers the boy is “alone”, using the word, one, and a window to create the word alone.  We run through several scenes, of seals, apes, monkeys, and mice where letters from the first page are used for the next page. Each scene is done in generous swatches of bold colors.  We arrive at the final page showing the “one boy”—an artist!  A lovely, surprise ending.  Although numbers are not used, this can multitask as a counting book, when the reader is ready.

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Press Here

Press Here
By Henre Tullet
Chronicle, 2011 Originally published in France, 2010

An interactive book that will delight and entertain a child for hours!

Author/artist Henre Tullet brilliantly asks the reader to press a yellow dot and turn the next page, where two yellow dots appear.  When three yellow dots display on the page, he asks the reader to touch the one on the left, and on the next page it turns red!  Throughout the book, the author asks the reader to tilt it to the left, shake them up, press all the dots, and tap the dot five times and each action results in something happening.  Magic!  In the meantime, the reader is learning colors, numbers, his/her left and right and how to follow directions!

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From Head to Toe

From Head to Toe
by Eric Carle
Harper-Collins Children’s Books 1997

Listed in 2014 as one of the top eleven books that should be included on every child’s bookshelf, I picked up this book and found out why. It introduces a child to animals, to different parts of their body and invites them to move their body, too. The story, along with Eric Carle’s bright vivid illustrations, enlists a child’s imagination and physical experience to learn more about themselves.

A book to engage a toddler’s movement with reading a book. A brilliant book for the youngest readers and listeners; a perfect book for every child’s library.

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The Very Hungry Caterpillar

The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Eric Carle
Philomel Books, 1969

I now understand why this book continues to be a very big seller year after year—it has everything to fascinate a child.

First, on the cover, appears a very large green caterpillar, with a clashing red head. On the fourth page in, the largest, warmest, friendliest sun glows. Then—so cool—an actual hole is punched in an apple. And holes are punched in pears, blueberries, strawberries, oranges, and all of a child’s favorite foods, until the eating caterpillar gets a tummy ache. Then the reader learns how a caterpillar turns into a butterfly. The art looks like kid art. Simple, kid friendly, engaging with cool holes-—a ‘must have’ for the earliest of readers. I’m sure some can count the holes, count the fruits and practice math, too. A brilliant book for pre-readers.

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