Tag Archives: Laura Vaccaro Seeger

First the Egg

First the Egg
by Laura Vaccaro Seeger
Neal Porter Book, Roaring Brook Press, 2007
Caldecott Honor Book

In big, soothing colors, author/illustrator Laura Vaccaro Seeger introduces the youngest reader/listeners to the concepts of ‘first’ and ‘then’.  She begins, of course, with “First the egg, then the chicken”.  And she adds an extra fascination for toddlers and carves out an egg-shaped hole, connecting the egg with the chicken.  She repeats the idea with “First the tadpole (with a cut out of a green tadpole), then the frog.”  Young readers are introduced to seeds and flowers, caterpillars and butterflies and even words and stories.  Award-winning author/illustrator’s ending brings the story back around to the egg; a subtle reference to which comes first, a chicken or an egg.  Very clever concept book on “first” and “then”, and a comforting book to read.

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One Boy

One Boy
by Laura Vaccaro Seeger
Neal Porter Book, Roaring Brook Press, 2008

The book opens with one boy, and the reader turns the page and discovers the boy is “alone”, using the word, one, and a window to create the word alone.  We run through several scenes, of seals, apes, monkeys, and mice where letters from the first page are used for the next page. Each scene is done in generous swatches of bold colors.  We arrive at the final page showing the “one boy”—an artist!  A lovely, surprise ending.  Although numbers are not used, this can multitask as a counting book, when the reader is ready.

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Bully

Bully
by Laura Vaccaro Seeger
Neal Porter, Roaring Brook Press, 2013

Bully’s can make mistakes, and the red bull in Bully did.  Because someone bullied him, he was mad and took it out and bullied someone else.  And someone else.  And someone else and in each scene the bull grew bigger and bigger, scarier and scarier.  Until finally someone saw through the veneer (pain) and called the red bull a bully.  Having someone call him a bully turned the red bull upside down and inside out and took out all his (anger).  He didn’t like what he felt, bullying others around.  But by then he had returned to his regular size.  Re-thinking what he wanted, he kindly asked the ones he had just bullied, “Do you want to play?”  All forgiven and forgotten, they wandered off together, friends.

This is a bully book toddlers can understand.  Simple.

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